Eight long-lasting coronavirus symptoms which may mean you're immune for 5 months



Article By: James Rodger

The first report from Public Health England's Siren study found that antibodies from past infection provide 83% protection against reinfection for at least five months



Public Health England's Siren study found that antibodies from past Covid infection provide 83 per cent protection against reinfection for at least five months.

The first report from Public Health England's Siren study found that antibodies from past infection provide 83% protection against reinfection for at least five months.

Although reinfections in people with antibodies were rare, the researchers identified 44 potential reinfections among 6,614 people who had had Covid-19 previously, putting them at risk of transmitting the virus to others.

But there are warnings that just because this is possible - it does not mean you can return to normal amid the third national lockdown.

There are some long-lasting effects of Covid - away from the usual symptoms, like a cough, loss of taste or smell and fever - which could hint whether you have antibodies.

The Health Editor of Good Morning Britain, Dr Hilary, yesterday said: "If you get the natural disease, you have immunity, and if you have the vaccination, you have a similar immunity. So that is good."

Dr Hilary added: "It is good to have it confirmed."

Although reinfections in people with antibodies were rare, the researchers identified 44 potential reinfections among 6,614 participants who showed evidence of previous infection.

Brain fog

An MP suffering from long Covid says his short-term memory has been "shot to pieces" and he continues to experience brain fog.

Labour's Andrew Gwynne explained he began to feel "grotty and run down" in March, displayed Covid-19 symptoms, and his initial illness lasted for about 12 days, although he still feels the effects today.

The MP for Denton and Reddish told the Commons: "My condition is not as severe as it was even just a few months back, there have been real improvements, but it's been a hard slog to get here.

"For the first seven months or so, the exhaustion came back frequently and to the point where doing just simple tasks around the house brought me out in massive sweats like I'd run the London Marathon.

"I had lots of dizzy spells, I've never had vertigo before this, and oh the brain fog - in a job where you have to be razor sharp, my short-term memory is shot to pieces. I've had to learn to pace myself, trying to push my limits would set me back. I still have to remind myself not to overdo it.

"Now the lasting symptom is still brain fog. When it's bad, taking in information and processing it is so difficult and physically and mentally tiring, often triggering headaches, dizziness and vertigo."

Loss of sense of smell and taste

The British Association of Otorhinolaryngology warned that losing your sense of smell and taste may mean you have Covid-19.

The ear, nose and throat specialist recommended anyone with such symptoms self-isolate immediately.

Physical fatigue

Another common symptom of Covid-19, as well as cold, flu and many viruses in general, is feeling tired or fatigued.

Being told to rest is common when you’re ill, but feeling tired and not being able to sleep due to coughs and difficulty breathing, can make things all the more difficult.

Sore tummy

As with a loss of appetite, enduring a tummy ache may easily be passed off as a sign of something more innocuous.

However, a newly published study by the American Journal of Gastroenterology links tummy problems to Covid-19.

They found that 48.5 per cent of 204 people who have been infected by the coronavirus in China's Hubei province had digestive symptoms such as diarrhoea.

Red eyes

The College of Optometrists said: "It is recognised that any upper respiratory tract infection may result in viral conjunctivitis as a secondary complication, and this is also the case with Covid-19.

"However, it is unlikely that a person would present with viral conjunctivitis secondary to Covid-19 without other symptoms of fever or a continuous cough as conjunctivitis seems to be a late feature where is has occurred."
Lack of appetite

Jaimuay Sae-ung, 73, was the first Thai national to contract coronavirus in December last year.

Despite having underlying health conditions, including a heart problem, Jaimuay survived the illness after doctors isolated her at a hospital in Thailand for treatment.

"I only knew (I had coronavirus) after I came to the hospital," the mother of seven told Sky News.

"I felt a bit sad, a bit shocked, tired and fatigued and I couldn't eat."

Foot lesions

The Spanish General Council of Official Podiatrist Colleges shared a statement revealing that several coronavirus patients had lesions on their feet.

The statement said: "They are purple lesions (very similar to those of chickenpox, measles or chilblains) which usually appear on the toes and normally heal without leaving a mark."

They added that it was a "curious finding" which had also been observed in "numerous" Covid-19 patients in Italy and France, as well as Spain, according to dermatologists and podiatrists.

Covid tongue

"One in five people with Covid still present with less common symptoms that don't get on the official PHE list - such as skin rashes.

"Seeing increasing numbers of Covid tongues and strange mouth ulcers.

"If you have a strange symptom or even just headache and fatigue stay at home!"



READ ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Related News

PeopleWith App Symptoms Tracking